How long can you be on Sick Leave before Dismissal

How long can you be on Sick Leave before Dismissal?, Long haul diseases or wounds can happen to any of us and most will encounter this once in the course of their life. In any case, for managers having a staff part off on debilitated leave for extensive stretches of time can be costly and surprisingly problematic to your business objectives!

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How long can you be on Sick Leave before Dismissal From Job

It’s an unfortunate part of doing business, but from time to time, people need to be let go. And this can be necessary even when they’re away on sick leave. So the answer is yes, you can dismiss someone who’s off sick or How long can you be on Sick Leave before Dismissal- as long as you go through the correct disciplinary procedures.

Long-term sickness absence is usually defined as a period of continuous absence of more than four weeks. The absence may be due to: an unexpected illness. a chronic condition.

How long can you be on Sick Leave before Dismissal Notice

Yes, you can dismiss an employee on long term sick or How long can you be on Sick Leave before Dismissal, but only after following a reasonable process.

If your employee has more than two years’ service and/or their absence is due to a disability you are at risk of an unfair dismissal and/or discrimination claim. Before considering dismissal, you should be holding a series of meetings and obtaining medical information to guide your decision making.

If your employee has a condition that counts as a disability under the Equality Act 2010, you are required to explore reasonable adjustments to enable them to return to work.

Although employees on long term sick can present difficulties for small businesses, it’s essential that you follow the right process before considering dismissal. The steps to remember are:

1. Ensure you continue to receive Fit Notes.

2. Keep in regular touch with the employee and hold an absence review meeting roughly every six weeks.

3. Prior to considering a dismissal, request information from their GP or Occupational Health (with the employee’s permission).

4. Consider if any reasonable adjustments can be made or whether there are any alternatives to dismissal.

5. Document the impact their absence is having on the organization.

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